Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Deep Play

I'm not antisocial. Really. But when the guy on the plane next to me wanted to talk about reflexive nouns, I politely smiled and dove into my book, which had nothing at all to do with reflexive nouns. But I have to wonder how Diane Ackerman, who seems capable of drumming up an enthusiastic interest in anything, might feel about reflexive nouns. Would she regard linguistic forms as a kind of deep play? I suppose, in the right hands. For me, photography is my current form of deep play. My projects, which start with a simple idea and grow like weeds over time, are deep play. They say if you find something to do that you love, you'll never work a day in your life. Some people are lucky enough to be fairly happy doing just about anything, but deep play involves the boundaries of time and place. It has specific rules and rituals. It involves getting so entranced in the thing you are doing that the rest of the world falls away.

What do you consider 'deep play'?

No comments:

Share this with the world

Bookmark and Share